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Jan 27, 2015

The New Drivers of Europe's Geopolitics

   
"The New Drivers of Europe's Geopolitics is republished with permission of Stratfor."
By George Friedman

For the past two weeks, I have focused on the growing fragmentation of Europe. Two weeks ago, the murders in Paris prompted me to write about the fault line between Europe and the Islamic world. Last week, I wrote about thenationalism that is rising in individual European countries after the European Central Bank was forced to allow national banks to participate in quantitative easing so European nations wouldn't be forced to bear the debt of other nations. I am focusing on fragmentation partly because it is happening before our eyes, partly because Stratfor has been forecasting this for a long time and partly because my new book on the fragmentation of Europe — Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe — is being released today.

This is the week to speak of the political and social fragmentation within European nations and its impact on Europe as a whole. The coalition of the Radical Left party, known as Syriza, has scored a major victory in Greece. Now the party is forming a ruling coalition and overwhelming the traditional mainstream parties. It is drawing along other left-wing and right-wing parties that are united only in their resistance to the EU's insistence that austerity is the solution to the ongoing economic crisis that began in 2008.

Two Versions of the Same Tale

The story is well known. The financial crisis of 2008, which began as a mortgage default issue in the United States, created a sovereign debt crisis in Europe. Some European countries were unable to make payment on bonds, and this threatened the European banking system. There had to be some sort of state intervention, but there was a fundamental disagreement about what problem had to be solved. Broadly speaking, there were two narratives.

The German version, and the one that became the conventional view in Europe, is that the sovereign debt crisis is the result of irresponsible social policies in Greece, the country with the greatest debt problem. These troublesome policies included early retirement for government workers, excessive unemployment benefits and so on. Politicians had bought votes by squandering resources on social programs the country couldn't afford, did not rigorously collect taxes and failed to promote hard work and industriousness. Therefore, the crisis that was threatening the banking system was rooted in the irresponsibility of the debtors.

Another version, hardly heard in the early days but far more credible today, is that the crisis is the result of Germany's irresponsibility. Germany, the fourth-largest economy in the world, exports the equivalent of about 50 percent of its gross domestic product because German consumers cannot support its oversized industrial output. The result is that Germany survives on an export surge. For Germany, the European Union — with its free-trade zone, the euro and regulations in Brussels — is a means for maintaining exports. The loans German banks made to countries such as Greece after 2009 were designed to maintain demand for its exports. The Germans knew the debts could not be repaid, but they wanted to kick the can down the road and avoid dealing with the fact that their export addiction could not be maintained.

Read more . .  http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/new-drivers-europes-geopolitics

Jan 14, 2015

Deciphering the landscape for Privacy by Design. ENISA publishes its recommendations for policy makers, data protection authorities and experts — ENISA

Jan 12, 2015
Deciphering the landscape for Privacy by Design. ENISA publishes its recommendations for policy makers, data protection authorities and experts
ENISA publishes today, 12th January 2015, a cutting edge report on Privacy and Data Protection by Design - from policy to engineering. The report aims to bridge the gap between the legal framework and the available technological implementation measures. It provides an inventory of the existing approaches and privacy design strategies, and the technical building blocks of various degree of maturity from research and development. Limitations and inherent constraints are presented with recommendations for their mitigation.
The study, targeted at data protection authorities, policy makers, regulaltors, engineers and researchers, offers an insight into the technological aspect of the current state of the art. It presents the challenges and limitations of by-design principles for privacy and data protection, acts as a reference guide, and intends to improve the effectiveness of future policy in the area.
The main challenges identified in the report are two fold:  
  • Existing policy doesn’t offer a guarantee for compliance with privacy by design. New policy should give incentives for adopting privacy by design.
  • New standards for electronic communication need to consider privacy and data protection, while privacy and data protection-ignorant standards should be out-phased.
Furthermore, privacy by design needs to be linked with the practice taking usability into account.
Deciphering the landscape for Privacy by Design. ENISA publishes its recommendations for policy makers, data protection authorities and experts — ENISA: Deciphering the landscape for Privacy by Design. ENISA publishes its recommendations for policy makers, data protection authorities and experts — ENISA

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